A week’s worth of smiles

Feb 26

A week’s worth of smiles

Seven things that made me smile today: 7.  Putting away “stuff” today, I remembered I got a double Qwirkle in the game that Brad, Maren and I played on a school night after we tucked Greta into bed.  Qwirkle is our current favorite game, and double Qwirkle-ing is elusive and awesome.  Maren is competitive with the grown-ups at board games now and I love that she legitimately beats me.  (But I won that night.) Big kids are fun in totally different ways than little kids.  The fact that my “big” kid is seven is not lost on me; she’s still little!  I treasure each year for different reasons. 6.  Greta can write her name.  Sort of.  She can’t do the “e”.  (In her defense, think about the mechanism of an uppercase G and then a lowercase e.  It’s tricky, people.)  This happened all of a sudden; we went from scribbles to G’s everywhere to her name in two weeks.  Boom.  There’s a reason I often type “Great” when I’m trying to type “Greta”.  She’s Greta the Great. I love kid art and kid writing.  (She’s written “GrGta”in pink crayon because she believes pink and purple are the only colors worthy of existence.) 5.  I have a snowman in my front yard.  She’s awesome, and the four of us had so much fun — and so many giggles — building her on Saturday.  We had an epic snow week with ten consecutive no school days, and we *loved* it.  Our traditions are play in the snow, make hot chocolate with marshmallows, no chores for kids (and as few as possible for Mom), bake something in the oven and eat it while it is still warm, and include neighborhood friends. Snow days are one of childhood’s greatest thrills. 4.  I have an event coming up that requires cocktail attire, so I am trying to figure out what to wear.  Dressing my breast-less body is a challenge, but I’ve figured out normal clothes and tackled swim suits the past two summers.  Formal(ish) wear is new for me, and fashion is not intuitive for me.  I tried several dresses on for Brad one night and he gave me good, constructive, loving feedback.  I felt...

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Mom’s breakfast

Feb 11

Today was the Mom’s Breakfast at Maren’s elementary school.  Half of the alphabet went yesterday, and half today: 350 moms and students gathered in the school cafetorium for a breakfast this morning. Maren has been so excited about this.  (So has Greta!)  It’s so fun for our roles to reverse and for her to be the leader to show me something new. We got there early.  We had the choice of seats and sat at the purple table (Greta’s choice) on the side where we could best see the screen for the video (Maren’s choice). As we walked towards the food line, I saw a young mama wearing a really nice head scarf with her sweatshirt and jeans; I flash-backed that for last year’s Mom’s Thing at Maren’s school, I wore a pink knit hat to cover my (cold) bald head, and Maren was wiggley-excited for me to be at her school then, too.  This time last year I was chemo-bald, and I know the look.  I desperately wanted to walk up to this mama and give her a fierce hug and tell her I’ve-been-there-too.  You. Are. Not. Alone.  I see you, Bald Mama, I see you rocking Mom’s Breakfast and prioritizing your moment with your kiddo instead of your self-conscious bald head and (probably) sicky chemo symptoms.  I’m proud of you Bald Mama.  Rock on. I didn’t do that because Bald Mama and I were both there for our kids.  Being a mama is my first priority, and I have to protect that.  If I participated in every breast cancer event/rally/fundraiser, I would miss out on what matters most.  If I had a moment-that-mattered with Bald Mama, I would have missed on a moment-that-mattered with M and G.   I hope I run into Bald Mama again, so that I can actually high-five her; for now I send a high-five into the universe and hope she catches it as she goes about her day today. The school has a tradition of filming each student at the school saying, “I love my Mom because … “, and then they play the video during the event.  So, we watched a thirty-eight minute video while the hundreds of students cycled through....

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